Lee Supply Corporate Office | 6610 Guion Road P.O. Box 681430 | Indianapolis, IN 46268

Phone: (317) 290-2500 | Toll Free: (800) 873-1103 | Fax (317) 290-2512

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©2019 Lee Supply Corp

©2019 Lee Supply Corp

WATCO Reduction Systems

Catalytic Sulfur Reduction Systems

 

The catalytic filtration system includes a single filtration tank with a pocket of air and a backwashing control valve. Incoming water flows into the control valve and is directed into the filtration tank. Exposure to the air in this tank will start oxidizing any iron which is then trapped by the media. The iron/sulfur-free water then returns to the control valve where it is directed into the service lines. 

Spec Sheet: WATCO Catalytic Sulfur Reduction System


Iron Reduction System (1P & 1PE)

The 1P & 1PE iron filtration systems include a single filtration tank with a pocket of air and a backwashing control valve. Incoming water flows into the control valve and is directed into the filtration tank. Exposure to the air in this tank will start oxidizing the iron which is then trapped by the media. The iron-free water then returns to the control valve where it is directed into the service lines. 

Spec Sheet: WATCO Iron Reduction System 1P & 1PE

Iron Reduction System (2P & 2PE)

The iron filtration system includes an aeration tank, a filtration tank and a backwashing control valve. Incoming water flows into the control valve and is directed into the aeration tank. Exposure to the air in this tank will begin oxidizing any clear water iron. The water then flows through the back connector tube and into the filtration tank where oxidized iron is trapped by the filter media. The iron-free water then returns to the control valve where it is directed into the service lines. ​

Spec Sheet: WATCO Iron Reduction System 2P & 2PE

Pre-Installation Instructions

Water Quality 

While the filter will perform under a variety of water qualities there are a few things that need to be considered to ensure satisfactory performance. The water should be tested to determine the concentration, or levels of the items listed below. 

 

pH - A measurement of the acidity of the water. pH is reported on a scale from 0 to 14. Neutral water has a pH of 7.0, lower values indicate acidic water. The catalytic filter performs best when the pH is 7.0, or higher. pH values below 7.0 require a special media blend in the filter in order to elevate the pH for proper iron oxidation. 

Iron - A naturally occurring metallic element. Iron concentrations in excess of 0.3 milligrams/liter (mg/l) combine with oxygen causing orange or red (rust) stains on plumbing fixtures. Iron naturally exists in some water sources in either clear water (ferrous) state, red water (ferric) state or bacterial form. The catalytic filter can reduce any of these forms of iron. 

 

Manganese - A naturally occurring metallic element. Manganese concentrations as low as 0.05 milligrams/liter (mg/l) can combine with oxygen to cause dark brown or black staining on fixtures. Additionally, manganese can cause an odor in the water similar to a “rotten egg” smell. The catalytic filter reduces manganese as well as iron, however, manganese oxidation requires the pH of the water to be elevated to 8.2 or higher. 

Tannin - A naturally occurring humic acid. Tannin is an acid caused by water passing through decaying vegetation. Coffee and Tea are prime examples of tannin in water. As hot water passes over the coffee beans, or tea leaves, the tannin is extracted causing color and flavor in the water. Tannin concentrations as low as 0.3 milligrams per liter can cause a yellow discoloration in the water and may interfere with the filter’s long-term ability to function properly as the media becomes coated with the tannic acid. 

Hydrogen Sulfide - A naturally occurring gas. Hydrogen sulfide, more commonly referred to as sulfur gas, causes a distinct odor similar to “rotten eggs.” Due to its gaseous nature, hydrogen sulfide must be tested at the well site within 1 minute of drawing the sample. If a water sample has been sitting for a while the sulfur gas will dissipate and cause the hydrogen sulfide test to be lower than the actual concentration. If sulfur is present, the filter should be set to backwash more frequently to prevent the gas from building up.